© 2016 by Taoist Acupuncture and ZhiNeng QiGong Australia

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Wu Yi QiGong (Shamanic Medicine QiGong)

 

The ancient roots of Chinese Medicine, Qigong, Astrology and Feng Shui all originated from ancient chinese shamanism.

These shamans were known as WuYi and were highly respected in the community.  

 

The definition of WuYi is a very good metaphor for Qigong practice. The Chinese Character for Wu translates as Sorcerer and was later replaced with the character Yi Doctor of Medicine.

 

There are a couple of other meanings of WuYi, although they are completely different chinese characters to the WuYi above. Sounding similar, they are written the same in pinyin (English letters used for Mandarin characters). Wu meaning emptiness (as in Wu Ji) and Yi meaning intention. I include this meaning of WuYi because it aptly explains the best way to practice Qigong, with empty intention.

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Additionally Wu is the number 5 and Yi the number 1, therefore 5 to 1. This refers to the unification of the 5 Souls (Ling) that regulate emotions housed in the Yin organs into 1 Consciousness (Shen).

 

Therefore these three meanings mimic the concept of Tao. Qigong came from the WuYi who understood Tao came from emptiness. We practice WuYi Qigong and through empty intention (action through non-action) are filled with Qi and connected to Tao. Through meditation we can foster and cultivate the 5 positive emotional attributes (Virtue) and unify them into 1 consciousness and return to the Tao. All of which adds up to a healthier, happier and more contented life.

 

The famed Huang Di (Yellow Emperor) is considered the founder of shamanistic Taoism and was believed to live in China around 3,000 BC.  

Lao Tzu is another influential WuYi considered the father of philosophical Taoism, but lived later around 220 BC. 

 

Tel: (02) 6629 1421     M: 0402 121 752     Email: TaoistAcupuncture@gmail.com